Sunday

19th Jan 2020

'Reform or we leave EU,' warns British chancellor

  • Osborne: 'It is the status quo which condemns the people of Europe to an ongoing economic crisis' (Photo: consilium.europa.eu)

The UK will leave the European Union if the bloc refuses to reform, the country's chancellor George Osborne said on Wednesday (15 January).

Speaking at the start of a two day conference on EU reform organised by the Open Europe think tank, Osborne said that the EU had to decide whether to "reform or decline".

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 30-day free trial.

... or join as a group

"It is the status quo which condemns the people of Europe to an ongoing economic crisis and continuing decline," he added.

He also urged that Europe's labour market was becoming increasingly uncompetitive and was falling behind China and other economic blocs.

Prime Minister David Cameron last year set out plans to renegotiate the terms of Britain's EU membership. The reforms are to be followed by a public vote. His Conservative party are currently piloting a bill through parliament to guarantee a referendum on EU membership in 2017 if it wins the next election in 2015.

The Conservative party, which dominates the UK's coalition government, wants the EU to focus on completing the single market and prioritise free trade deals with the US, Japan and China.

Osborne also warned the EU not to allow the will of the 18 eurozone countries to compromise the countries outside the single currency.

"If you cannot protect the collective interests of non-eurozone member states, then they will have to choose between joining the eurozone, which the UK will not do, or leave the European Union."

"I believe it is in no-one's interests for Britain to come to face a choice between joining the euro or leaving the European Union."

Speaking with reporters after Osborne's speech, Andrea Leadsom, the Conservative MP who chairs the Fresh Start group of MPs demanding EU reform, said a UK referendum was "inevitable."

Members of Fresh Start were among 95 backbench MPs to sign a letter to Cameron earlier this week demanding that the UK parliament be given the powers to block EU legislative proposals from the European Commission.

Although foreign minister William Hague quickly dismissed the idea as "unrealistic" the UK government plans to beef up the role of national parliaments in EU law-making.

Under the so-called 'yellow card' procedure, national parliaments have the right to send a proposal back to the commission if one third of them believe the issue could be better dealt with at national level.

Critics say the eight-week window to object is too narrow and that the commission can simply re-table the proposal if it wishes. The procedure has only been used twice since 2010.

The UK government says that it is not alone in demanding reform in Brussels citing the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark as possible allies.

However, there are concerns among Britain's business community about the prospects of leaving the EU. On Wednesday car-manufacturer Ford indicated that it would withdraw its investment if the UK exited the bloc.

For his part, John Longworth, director general of the British Chambers of Commerce, warned that businesses needed more clarity on Cameron's negotiation plans.

"It has been a year since the prime minister announced his intentions on Europe, and we are still yet to learn what areas he will seek to negotiate," he said.

Agenda

Davos and Libya in focus This WEEK

The all-powerful will meet in Davos after Berlin tries to resolve the Libyan conflict over the weekend, while MEPs will set the stage for final ratification of the Brexit deal.

China spy suspect worked for EU for 30 years

The former EU ambassador suspected by German prosecutors of spying for China was Gerhard Sabathil, according to EU officials speaking on condition of anonymity.

News in Brief

  1. 'No objection in principle' on Huawei cooperation, EU says
  2. French aircraft carrier goes to Middle East amid tensions
  3. EU suggests temporary ban on facial recognition
  4. EU industry cries foul on Chinese restrictions
  5. 'Devil in detail', EU warns on US-China trade deal
  6. Trump threatened EU-tariffs over Iran, Germany confirms
  7. EU trade commissioner warns UK of 'brinkmanship'
  8. Germany strikes coal phase-out deal

Boost for Right in post-Brexit EU parliament

The far-right Identity and Democracy will overtake the Greens as the fourth-largest party in the European Parliament on 1 February, after the UK's MEPs vacate their seats.

Opinion

Why EU minimum wage is actually bad idea for workers

As president of one of the largest trade union confederations in the EU, I see the need for good working conditions and decent pay in all member states - but an EU-wide minimum wage could be used to lower wages.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of Ministers40 years of experience have proven its point: Sustainable financing actually works
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic and Baltic ministers paving the way for 5G in the region
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersEarmarked paternity leave – an effective way to change norms
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Climate Action Weeks in December
  5. UNESDAUNESDA welcomes Nicholas Hodac as new Director General
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersBrussels welcomes Nordic culture

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. UNESDAUNESDA appoints Nicholas Hodac as Director General
  2. UNESDASoft drinks industry co-signs Circular Plastics Alliance Declaration
  3. FEANIEngineers Europe Advisory Group: Building the engineers of the future
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersNew programme studies infectious diseases and antibiotic resistance
  5. UNESDAUNESDA reduces added sugars 11.9% between 2015-2017
  6. International Partnership for Human RightsEU-Uzbekistan Human Rights Dialogue: EU to raise key fundamental rights issues

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us