Thursday

5th May 2016

'Reform or we leave EU,' warns British chancellor

  • Osborne: 'It is the status quo which condemns the people of Europe to an ongoing economic crisis' (Photo: consilium.europa.eu)

The UK will leave the European Union if the bloc refuses to reform, the country's chancellor George Osborne said on Wednesday (15 January).

Speaking at the start of a two day conference on EU reform organised by the Open Europe think tank, Osborne said that the EU had to decide whether to "reform or decline".

Dear EUobserver reader

Subscribe now for unrestricted access to EUobserver.

Sign up for 30 days' free trial, no obligation. Full subscription only 15 € / month or 150 € / year.

  1. Unlimited access on desktop and mobile
  2. All premium articles, analysis, commentary and investigations
  3. EUobserver archives

EUobserver is the only independent news media covering EU affairs in Brussels and all 28 member states.

♡ We value your support.

If you already have an account click here to login.

"It is the status quo which condemns the people of Europe to an ongoing economic crisis and continuing decline," he added.

He also urged that Europe's labour market was becoming increasingly uncompetitive and was falling behind China and other economic blocs.

Prime Minister David Cameron last year set out plans to renegotiate the terms of Britain's EU membership. The reforms are to be followed by a public vote. His Conservative party are currently piloting a bill through parliament to guarantee a referendum on EU membership in 2017 if it wins the next election in 2015.

The Conservative party, which dominates the UK's coalition government, wants the EU to focus on completing the single market and prioritise free trade deals with the US, Japan and China.

Osborne also warned the EU not to allow the will of the 18 eurozone countries to compromise the countries outside the single currency.

"If you cannot protect the collective interests of non-eurozone member states, then they will have to choose between joining the eurozone, which the UK will not do, or leave the European Union."

"I believe it is in no-one's interests for Britain to come to face a choice between joining the euro or leaving the European Union."

Speaking with reporters after Osborne's speech, Andrea Leadsom, the Conservative MP who chairs the Fresh Start group of MPs demanding EU reform, said a UK referendum was "inevitable."

Members of Fresh Start were among 95 backbench MPs to sign a letter to Cameron earlier this week demanding that the UK parliament be given the powers to block EU legislative proposals from the European Commission.

Although foreign minister William Hague quickly dismissed the idea as "unrealistic" the UK government plans to beef up the role of national parliaments in EU law-making.

Under the so-called 'yellow card' procedure, national parliaments have the right to send a proposal back to the commission if one third of them believe the issue could be better dealt with at national level.

Critics say the eight-week window to object is too narrow and that the commission can simply re-table the proposal if it wishes. The procedure has only been used twice since 2010.

The UK government says that it is not alone in demanding reform in Brussels citing the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark as possible allies.

However, there are concerns among Britain's business community about the prospects of leaving the EU. On Wednesday car-manufacturer Ford indicated that it would withdraw its investment if the UK exited the bloc.

For his part, John Longworth, director general of the British Chambers of Commerce, warned that businesses needed more clarity on Cameron's negotiation plans.

"It has been a year since the prime minister announced his intentions on Europe, and we are still yet to learn what areas he will seek to negotiate," he said.

Feature

Renzi's chance to act like a grown-up

With other EU states busy on internal issues, the Italian PM sees a chance to push his vision of Europe. Friday's Papal visit by EU leaders will showcase the new Renzi.

EU recovery to slow this year

On just 1.8 percent growth, the commission's forecast is less optimistic than before because of an instable global economy and lack of results of EU reforms.

News in Brief

  1. EU parliament drivers forced to open doors and carry bags
  2. EU Commission proposes visa-free travel for Turkey
  3. Iceland in court for not respecting EU laws
  4. Sweden registers more asylum application withdrawals
  5. German Pegida leader convicted of inciting hatred
  6. ECB expected to stop printing €500 notes
  7. Spain dissolves parliament for 26 June election
  8. Germany to legalise cannabis for medicinal use

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Centre Maurits CoppetiersBrexit Could Increase Support for Independence in Pro-EU Scotland
  2. European Music CouncilRegister Now for the 6th European Forum on Music in Wroclaw, European Capital of Culture 2016
  3. Belgrade Security ForumJoin Our Team for the 6th Belgrade Security Forum. Apply Now! Deadline May 20
  4. European Roundtable of IndustrialistsCompanies Make Progress on Number of Women in Leadership Roles
  5. Counter BalanceParliament Gets Tough on Control EU Bank's Funds
  6. ICRCSyria: Aleppo on the Brink of Humanitarian Disaster
  7. CESIWorld Day For Health and Safety at Work: Public Sector Workers in The Focus
  8. EFABasque Peace Process-Arnaldo Otegi Visits the European Parliament
  9. EscardioChina Pays Price of Western Lifestyle With Soaring Childhood Obesity
  10. Centre Maurits CoppetiersThe Existence of a State is a Question of Fact, Not a Question of Law
  11. ICRCSyria: Aid for Over 120,000 People Arrives in Besieged Town Near Homs