Saturday

18th Nov 2017

Nice Treaty - the reader friendly edition

Until now it has been impossible to read the Nice Treaty because the Treaty only consists of a lot of detached amendments to the existing treaties. A new book, the first published by the EUobserver.com now makes it possible to read the amendments together with the existing treaties so it is possible to judge the proposed amendments.

The book is available electronically and can be downloaded for private use by clicking the link below. Hardcopies can be bought via the EUbookshop.com and a CD-ROM is also available.

The Nice Treaty history

Thank you for reading EUobserver!

Subscribe now for a 30 day free trial.

  1. €150 per year
  2. or €15 per month
  3. Cancel anytime

EUobserver is an independent, not-for-profit news organization that publishes daily news reports, analysis, and investigations from Brussels and the EU member states. We are an indispensable news source for anyone who wants to know what is going on in the EU.

We are mainly funded by advertising and subscription revenues. As advertising revenues are falling fast, we depend on subscription revenues to support our journalism.

For group, corporate or student subscriptions, please contact us. See also our full Terms of Use.

If you already have an account click here to login.

The Treaty of Nice was finally adopted on 26 February after five days of negotiation at a summit in Nice in December 2000. It will not enter into force until it has been approved by all 15 EU Member States, the so-called ratification process.

The Treaty of Nice consists of additions and changes to the existing treaties meaning it can only be truly understood when it is compared with existing treaties.

The official consolidated version has not yet been published. Thus, this consolidation is based on the Councils version 2001/C 80/01 of the Treaty of Nice, the Treaty on European Union (TEU) and the Treaty establishing the European Community (TEC).

The Treaty is difficult to understand, even for experts.

The following tools make it easier to understand:

- All additions to the existing treaties are written in bold. If the Treaty of Nice is ratified, existing law will be all the articles printed with ordinary letters plus everything written in bold.

- What will no longer be existing law is marked in Italics and strikethrough. Thus existing law is everything written with ordinary letters and what is written in Italics and strikethrough, until the Treaty of Nice enters into force.

- The most important words are underlined in this version (but not in the official Treaty). Underlining makes it easier to go through the articles and find what you are looking for.

- Keywords and explanations have been added as blue text. They too are not part of the official version. However, it makes it easier to read because the reader does not have to look up all the references in order to remember, for example, what has been decided regarding qualified majority in the Treaty.

- Protocols are part of the Treaty and have the same legal status as the articles. Declarations are not part of the Treaty and are thus not legally binding – but they contribute to understanding the treaty.

- Every article has a number (the old number is written in parentheses). With the Treaty of Amsterdam a new system of numbers was introduced – for example "the flexibility clause", former article 235, is now article 308. The most important decision-procedure, the co-decision-procedure, is now to be found in article 251 (former article 189B). After each number TEU or TEC is written, referring to the Treaty on European Union (53 articles) and the Treaty establishing the European Community (314).

- Underlining and text in the margin have only been made from "an easy to read perspective." They have been reviewed by John Fitzmaurice, an advisor in the European Commission.

Agenda

EU agencies and eastern neighbours This WEEK

EU ministers will vote on where to relocate two EU agencies from the UK, while later EU leaders will host six eastern European countries in Brussels. Former Bosnian Serb commander Ratko Mladic awaits his verdict in the Hague.

Opinion

Mind the gap: inequality in our cities

Minimum wages, 'living' wages and a universal basic income are all part of the ongoing mix to find ways to reduce social inequality across the EU.

News in Brief

  1. Bonn climate talks extend into Friday evening
  2. UK needs to move on Brexit by early December, Tusk says
  3. Puigdemont extradition decision postponed to December
  4. Ireland wants written UK guarantees to avoid hard border
  5. US did not obstruct climate talks, says German minister
  6. EU signs social declaration
  7. Puigdemont to be heard by Belgian judges
  8. Steep fall in migrants reaching EU

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. European Jewish CongressAntisemitism in Europe Today: Is It Still a Threat to Free and Open Society?
  2. Counter BalanceNew Report: Juncker Plan Backs Billions in Fossil Fuels and Carbon-Heavy Infrastructure
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic countries prioritise fossil fuel subsidy reform
  4. Mission of China to the EUNew era for China brings new opportunities to all
  5. ACCASmall and Medium Sized Practices Must 'Offer the Whole Package'
  6. UNICEFAhead of the African Union - EU Summit, Survey Highlights Impact of Conflict on Education
  7. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Council Calls for Closer Co-Operation on Foreign Policy
  8. Swedish EnterprisesTrilogue Negotiations - Striking the Balance Between Transparency and Efficiency
  9. Access EuropeProspects for US-EU Relations Under the Trump Administration - 28 November 2017
  10. World Vision20 November: Exchange of Views at the EP on Children Affected by the Syria Crisis
  11. Nordic Council of MinistersSustainable Growth the Nordic Way: Climate Solutions for a Sustainable Future
  12. EU2017EEHow Data Fuels Estonia's Economy

Latest News

  1. EU keeps former Soviet states at arm's length
  2. EU leaders make pledge on social issues after populist backlash
  3. EU agencies and eastern neighbours This WEEK
  4. Germany slams Dutch call for more ambitious EU climate goal
  5. Mind the gap: inequality in our cities
  6. Climate activists 'disappointed' with EU at climate talks
  7. Davis outlines UK vision on Brexit in Berlin
  8. German coalition talks in near collapse