Thursday

29th Sep 2016

Commission axes pregnant workers bill

  • The Commission has promised to cut the regulatory burden on businesses. (Photo: Flickr.com)

The European Commission has announced that a plan to extend maternity leave for pregnant workers is one of five bills that will not be retabled in the next legislature.

Also killed off were bills on investor compensation schemes, and a 12-year old plan to set up a compensation fund for the victims of oil pollution damage.

Dear EUobserver reader

Subscribe now for unrestricted access to EUobserver.

Sign up for 30 days' free trial, no obligation. Full subscription only 15 € / month or 150 € / year.

  1. Unlimited access on desktop and mobile
  2. All premium articles, analysis, commentary and investigations
  3. EUobserver archives

EUobserver is the only independent news media covering EU affairs in Brussels and all 28 member states.

♡ We value your support.

If you already have an account click here to login.

In a statement on Wednesday (18 June), the commission said that it was “good legislative practice to withdraw proposals that do not advance in the legislative process,” and noted that the proposals were either “outdated” or lacked support by MEPs and ministers.

The EU executive added that it had abandoned plans to table legislation on occupational health and safety for hairdressers. It also intends to repeal legislation relating to energy labelling, transport rates and the common agricultural policy.

The commission says it has slashed the cost of administrative burdens by €32.3 billion and scrapped more than 6,000 legal acts since 2005.

It introduced the so-called Refit programme last October after a number of governments expressed frustration about the volume of EU regulation on businesses.

UK prime minister David Cameron raised the issue at an EU summit last autumn, complaining that firms were being "throttled" by EU red-tape.

Politicians and business groups have argued that for every regulation and directive introduced another should be abolished.

Syed Kamall, who was elected leader of the conservative ECR group last week, commented that “the commission is correct to start focusing attention on areas where EU law should be repealed or reformed”.

“We need a culture change from the 1950s vision that every problem can only be solved by EU legislation,” he added.

EU commission presents 'realistic' lobbying rules

The EU executive called for more stringent regulation of interest representatives trying to influence EU decision making. Critics say the 'transparency revolution' is being blocked by the European Parliament and EU member states.

New EU rules on financial products in limbo

A feud between MEPs and the EU commission is threatening to derail financial services regulation that would protect consumers from misleading investment products.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Counter BalanceWhy the Investment Plan for Europe Does not Drive the Sustainable Energy Transition
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersThe Nordic Region Seeks to Make Its Voice Heard in the World
  3. Taipei EU OfficeCountries Voice Support for Taiwan's Participation in ICAO
  4. World VisionNew Tool Measuring Government Efforts to Protect Children Released
  5. GoogleDid You Know Europe's Largest Dinosaur Gallery Is in Brussels? Check It Out Now
  6. IPHRHuman Rights in Uzbekistan After Karimov - Joint Statement
  7. CISPECloud Infrastructure Providers Unveil Data Protection Code of Conduct
  8. EFAMessages of Hope From the Basque Country and Galicia
  9. Access NowDigital Rights Heroes and Villains. See Who Protects Your Rights, Who Wants to Take Them Away
  10. EJCAppalled by Recommendation to Remove Hamas From EU Terrorism Watch List
  11. GoogleBringing Education to Refugees in Lebanon With the Clooney Foundation for Justice
  12. Belgrade Security ForumCan Democracy Survive Global Disorder?