Friday

1st Jul 2022

EU circles the wagons around Iran deal

  • President Donald Trump stopped short of pulling the US out of the Iran nuclear deal last week - but it may only be a temporary reprieve (Photo: Gage Skidmore)

The EU confirmed its commitment to support the 2015 nuclear agreement between Iran and major world powers during the Foreign Affairs Council in Luxembourg on Monday (16 October), in spite of the repeated complaints about the deal made by US president Donald Trump.

Quoting a joint declaration by the 28 foreign ministers, EU foreign affairs chief Federica Mogherini said the so-called Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) is a "key element for the balance" of "the situation in the region", and must remain in place in order to avoid serious "consequences for regional peace."

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

During the press conference Mogherini also announced she will travel to Washington early next month to bolster support for the accord.

Over the past weeks Trump has repeatedly criticised the deal signed by his predecessor Barack Obama, and on Friday refused to admit that Iran is complying with the agreement during a speech at the White House - stating that "multiple violations of the deal came from Tehran" and threatening to re-impose sanctions against the country.

"The issue with the Iran agreement is it does not achieve the objective," US secretary of state Rex Tillerson told CNN on Sunday.

"We're going to work with our European partners and allies to see if we can't address these concerns, which are concerns of all of us," he added.

In Luxembourg, Mogherini made clear that the International Atomic Energy Agency "has verified eight times that Iran is implementing all its nuclear related commitments" following a "comprehensive and strict monitoring system."

With the 2015 agreement, Iran agreed to limit its nuclear programme in exchange of a relief from the long-standing sanctions.

The joint statement said that Trump's decision not to certify Iran's compliance with the JCPOA was something that happens in the "context of an internal US process."

The US is now deciding on the deal, with Congress having 60 days to decide whether re-impose nuclear sanctions on Iran or not. The decision would require a simple majority that could be reached by Republicans in the Senate.

In this respect, the EU hopes the US will consider the "implications for the security in the US, its partners and the region" before taking further steps, the statement said.

EU in diplomatic push to save Iran deal

EU leaders mobilise to stop Trump's attack on Iran deal, as Congress prepares knife-edge vote with implications for trans-Atantic ties and Middle East stability.

EU visit to Iran designed to reassure banks

High-level EU trip designed to reassure international banks on doing business with Islamic Republic. Officials said won’t have time to meet human rights activists.

Analysis

Trump is 'gift' for China's EU agenda

The more harm Trump does to trans-Atlantic ties, the better for China's global interests, the author of a new study on Sino-European relations has said.

Analysis

EU has no 'magic bullet' against US Iran sanctions

EU leaders in Sofia will discuss how they can protect the bloc's economic interests against US threats to sanction companies doing business in Iran. But their options are limited.

EU piles last-minute pressure on US over Iran nuclear deal

US president Donald Trump is set to announce his decision on the Iran nuclear deal on Tuesday. The EU says it wants the deal to remain. "We believe the agreement is delivering," said a European commission spokesperson.

Opinion

Nato's Madrid summit — key takeaways

For the most part Nato and its 30 leaders rose to the occasion — but it wasn't without room for improvement. The lesson remains that Nato still doesn't know how or want to hold allies accountable for disruptive behaviour.

MEPs boycott awards over controversial sponsorship

Two MEPs have withdrawn their nominations from the MEPs Awards over the Swiss pharmaceutical company Novartis's participation as a sponsor — currently involved in an alleged bribery scandal in Greece.

News in Brief

  1. EU Parliament 'photographs protesting interpreters'
  2. Poland still failing to meet EU judicial criteria
  3. Report: Polish president fishing for UN job
  4. Auditors raise alarm on EU Commission use of consultants
  5. Kaliningrad talks needed with Russia, says Polish PM
  6. Report: EU to curb state-backed foreign takeovers
  7. EU announces trade deal with New Zealand
  8. Russia threatens Norway over goods transit

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic and Canadian ministers join forces to combat harmful content online
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic ministers write to EU about new food labelling
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersEmerging journalists from the Nordics and Canada report the facts of the climate crisis
  4. Council of the EUEU: new rules on corporate sustainability reporting
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic ministers for culture: Protect Ukraine’s cultural heritage!
  6. Reuters InstituteDigital News Report 2022

Latest News

  1. Nato's Madrid summit — key takeaways
  2. Czech presidency to fortify EU embrace of Ukraine
  3. Covid-profiting super rich should fight hunger, says UN food chief
  4. EU pollution and cancer — it doesn't have to be this way
  5. Israel smeared Palestinian activists, EU admits
  6. MEPs boycott awards over controversial sponsorship
  7. If Russia collapses — which states will break away?
  8. EU Parliament interpreters stage strike

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us